How to Write Histories of European Law?

Catégorie :Rencontres scientifiques

Date :mardi, 29 juin 2010

Lieu :Copenhagen (Danemark)

Contact : rasmussenmorten..a..mac.com

Résumé :

This first conference held by the RICHIE workshop on the history of European law is organised with the express purpose of establishing the history of European law as a distinctive field of research, identifying possible archival resources, constructing methodological frameworks and eventually writing histories of European law that not only fill in the current gap in historiography, but also contribute to ongoing legal and social science research in European law.

Détails :

Historians of European integration have for long neglected the history of European law. Little historical research exists on the role of the European Court of Justice as a motor of further integration, for example. As a result, historiography systematically has underestimated the extent to which processes of European integration in the Twentieth Century have been influenced and shaped by law. Considering the fundamental legal nature of the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC), the European Community (EC) and the European Union (EU), the result has been a distorted understanding of the institutional dimension of European integration.

This first conference held by the RICHIE workshop on the history of European law is organised with the express purpose of establishing the history of European law as a distinctive field of research, identifying possible archival resources, constructing methodological frameworks and eventually writing histories of European law that not only fill in the current gap in historiography, but also contribute to ongoing legal and social science research in European law.

The conference is organised by the following research network: Rethinking European Integration, (http://cemes.ku.dk/rethinking_european_integration/) Centre of Modern European Studies, Faculty of Humanities (CEMES) and Centre for Studies in Legal Culture, Faculty of Law (CRS) both part of the University of Copenhagen. It is funded by Rethinking European integration, CEMES and CRS.